Tag Archives: libsoup

Simple HTTP profiling of applications using sysprof

This is a quick write-up of a feature I added last year to libsoup and sysprof which exposes basic information about HTTP/HTTPS requests to sysprof, so they can be visualised in GNOME Builder.

Prerequisites

  • libsoup compiled with sysprof support (-Dsysprof=enabled), which should be the default if libsysprof-capture is available on your system.
  • Your application (and ideally its dependencies) uses libsoup for its HTTP requests; this won’t work with other network libraries.

Instructions

  • Run your application in Builder under sysprof, or under sysprof on the CLI (sysprof-cli -- your-command) then open the resulting capture file in Builder.
  • Ensure the ‘Timings’ row is visible in the ‘Instruments’ list on the left, and that the libsoup row is enabled beneath that.

Results

You should then be able to see a line in the ‘libsoup’ row for each HTTP/HTTPS request your application made. The line indicates the start time and duration of the request (from when the first byte of the request was sent to when the last byte of the response was received).

The details of the event contain the URI which was requested, whether the transaction was HTTP or HTTPS, the number of bytes sent and received, the Last-Modified header, If-Modified-Since header, If-None-Match header and the ETag header (subject to a pending fix).

What’s that useful for?

  • Seeing what requests your application is making, across all its libraries and dependencies — often it’s more than you think, and some of them can easily be optimised out. A request which is not noticeable to you on a fast internet connection will be noticeable to someone on a slower connection with higher request latencies.
  • Quickly checking that all requests are HTTPS rather than HTTP.
  • Quickly checking that all requests from the application set appropriate caching headers (If-Modified-Since, If-None-Match) and that all responses from the server do too (Last-Modified, ETag) — if a HTTP request can result in a cache hit, that’s potentially a significant bandwidth saving for the client, and an even bigger one for the server (if it’s seeing the same request from multiple clients).
  • Seeing a high-level overview of what bandwidth your application is using, and which HTTP requests are contributing most to that.
  • Seeing how it all ties in with other resource usage in your application, courtesy of sysprof.

Yes that seems useful

There’s plenty of scope for building this out into a more fully-featured way of inspecting HTTP requests using sysprof. By doing it from inside the process, using sysprof – rather than from outside, using Wireshark – this allows for visibility into TLS-encrypted conversations.

libgdata

It's about time to announce something I've been working on for about three months now: libgdata. It's a GLib-, libsoup- and libxml2-based library for accessing GData APIs, as used by most Google services. There already exist several such libraries in a variety of languages, but as far as I'm aware this is the first one written in C — and thus the first which is widely accessible to the GNOME stack. So far it has decent support for YouTube video queries, and the beginnings of Google Calendar support.

Having ported the Totem YouTube plugin to use libgdata, my next plan is to port the evolution-data-server Google Calendar backend as well. With that done, libgdata will hopefully be stable and fully-featured enough for people to get to work on starting to fulfil Rob Bradford's dream of tighter desktop integration with web services.