Tag Archives: Dunfell

GTK+ hackfest 2016

A dozen GNOME hackers invaded the Red Hat office in Toronto last week, to spend four days planning the next year of work on our favourite toolkit, GTK+; and to think about how Flatpak applications can best integrate with the rest of the desktop.

What did we do?

  • Worked out an approach for versioning GTK+ in future, to improve the balance between stability and speed of development. This has turned into a wiki page.
  • I demoed Dunfell and added support for visualising GTasks to it. I don’t know how much time I will have for it in the near future, so help and feedback are welcome.
  • There was a detailed discussion of portals for Flatpak, including lots of use cases, and the basics of a security design were decided which allows the most code reuse while also separating functionality. Simon has written more about this.
  • I missed some of the architectural discussion about the future of GTK+ (including moving some classes around, merging some things and stripping out some outdated things), but I believe Benjamin had useful discussions with people about it.
  • Allan, Philip, Mike and I looked at using hotdoc for developer.gnome.org, and possible layouts for a new version of the site. Christian spent some time thinking about integration of documentation into GNOME Builder.
  • Allison did a lot of blogging, and plotted with Alex to add some devious new GVariant functionality to make everyone’s lives easier when writing parsers — I’ll leave her to blog about it.

Thanks to Collabora for sending me along to take part!

After the hackfest, I spent a few days exploring Toronto, and as a result ended up very sunburned.

Instrumenting the GLib main loop with Dunfell

tl;dr: Visualise your main context and sources using Dunfell. Feedback and ideas welcome.

At the DX hackfest, I’ve been working on a new tool for instrumenting and visualising the behaviour of the GLib main context (or main contexts) in your program.

Screenshot from 2016-01-29 11-17-35

It’s called Dunfell (because I’m a sucker for hills) and at a high level it works by using SystemTap to record various GMainContext interactions in your program, saving them to a log file. The log file can then be examined using a viewer program.

The source is available on GitLab or GitHub because I still haven’t decided which is better.

In the screenshot above, each vertical line is a thread, each blue box is one dispatch phase of the main context which is currently running on that thread, each orange blob is a new GSource being created, and the green blob is a GSource which has been selected for closer inspection.

At the moment, it requires a couple of GLib patches to add some more SystemTap probe points, and it also requires a recent version of GTK+. It needs SystemTap, and I’ve only tested it on Fedora, so it might need some patching to work with the SystemTap installed on other distributions.

Screenshot from 2016-01-29 11-57-39

This screenshot is of a trace of the buffered-input-stream test from GIO, showing I/O callbacks being made across threads as idle source callbacks.

More visualisation ideas are welcome! At the moment, what Dunfell draws is quite simplistic. I hope it will be able to solve various common debugging problems eventually but suggestions for ways to do this intuitively, or for other problems to visualise, are welcome. Here are the use cases I was initially thinking about (from the README):

  • Detect GSources which are never added to a GMainContext.
  • Detect GSources which are dispatched too often (i.e. every main context iteration).
  • Detect GSources whose dispatch function takes too long (and hence blocks the main context).
  • Detect GSources which are never removed from their GMainContext after being dispatched (but which are never dispatched again).
  • Detect GMainContexts which have GSources attached or (especially) events pending, but which aren’t being iterated.
  • Monitor the load on each GMainContext, such as how many GSources it has attached, and how many events are processed each iteration.
  • Monitor ongoing asynchronous calls and GTasks, giving insight into their nesting and dependencies.
  • Monitor unfinished or stalled asynchronous calls.
  • Allow users to record logs to send to the developers for debugging on a different machine. The users may have to install additional software to record these logs (some component of Dunfell, plus its dependencies), but should not have to recompile or otherwise modify the program being debugged.
  • Work with programs which purely use GLib, through to programs which use GLib, GIO and GTK+.
  • Allow visualisation of this data, both in a standalone program, and in an IDE such as GNOME Builder.
  • Allow visualising differences between two traces.
  • Minimise runtime overhead of logging a program, to reduce the risk of disturbing race conditions by enabling logging.
  • Connecting to an already-running program is not a requirement, since by the time you’ve decided there’s a problem with a program, it’s already in the wrong state.