Tag Archives: Builder

GTK+ hackfest 2016

A dozen GNOME hackers invaded the Red Hat office in Toronto last week, to spend four days planning the next year of work on our favourite toolkit, GTK+; and to think about how Flatpak applications can best integrate with the rest of the desktop.

What did we do?

  • Worked out an approach for versioning GTK+ in future, to improve the balance between stability and speed of development. This has turned into a wiki page.
  • I demoed Dunfell and added support for visualising GTasks to it. I don’t know how much time I will have for it in the near future, so help and feedback are welcome.
  • There was a detailed discussion of portals for Flatpak, including lots of use cases, and the basics of a security design were decided which allows the most code reuse while also separating functionality. Simon has written more about this.
  • I missed some of the architectural discussion about the future of GTK+ (including moving some classes around, merging some things and stripping out some outdated things), but I believe Benjamin had useful discussions with people about it.
  • Allan, Philip, Mike and I looked at using hotdoc for developer.gnome.org, and possible layouts for a new version of the site. Christian spent some time thinking about integration of documentation into GNOME Builder.
  • Allison did a lot of blogging, and plotted with Alex to add some devious new GVariant functionality to make everyone’s lives easier when writing parsers — I’ll leave her to blog about it.

Thanks to Collabora for sending me along to take part!

After the hackfest, I spent a few days exploring Toronto, and as a result ended up very sunburned.

DX hackfest 2015: day 1

It’s a sunny Sunday here in Cambridge, UK, and GNOMErs have been arriving from far and wide for the first day of the 2015 developer experience hackfest. This is a week-long event, co-hosted with the winter docs hackfest (which Kat has promised to blog about!) in the Collabora offices.

Today was a bit of a slow start, since people were still arriving throughout the day. Regardless, there have been various discussions, with Ryan, Emmanuele and Christian discussing performance improvements in GLib, Christian and Allan plotting various different approaches to new UI in Builder, Cosimo and Carlos silently plugging away at GTK+, and Emmanuele muttering something about GProperty now and then.

Tomorrow, I hope we can flesh out some of these initial discussions a bit more and get some roadmapping down for GLib development for the next year, amongst other things. I am certain that Builder will feature heavily in discussions too, and apps and sandboxing, now that Alex has arrived.

I’ve spent a little time finishing off and releasing Walbottle, a small library and set of utilities I’ve been working on to implement JSON Schema, which is the equivalent of XML Schema or RELAX-NG, but for JSON files. It allows you to validate JSON instances against a schema, to validate schemas themselves and, unusually, to automatically generate parser unit tests from a schema. That way, you can automatically test json-glib–based JsonReader/JsonParser code, just by passing the JSON schema to Walbottle’s json-schema-generate utility.

It’s still a young project, but should be complete enough to be useful in testing JSON code. Please let me know of any bugs or missing features!

Tomorrow, I plan to dive back in to static analysis of GObject code with Tartan

Berlin DX hackfest and Clang

Last week I was in Berlin at the GNOME DX hackfest. My goal for the hackfest was to do further work on the fledgling gnome-clang, and work out ways of integrating it into GNOME. There were several really fruitful discussions about GIR, static analysis, Clang ASTs, and integration into Builder which have really helped flesh out my plans for gnome-clang.

The idea we have settled on is to use static analysis more pervasively in the GNOME build process. I will be looking into setting up a build bot to do static analysis on all GNOME modules, with the dual aims of catching bugs and improving the static analyser. Eventually I hope the analysis will become fast enough and accurate enough to be enabled on developers’ machines — but that’s a while away yet.

(For those who have no idea what gnome-clang is: it’s a plugin for the Clang static analyser I’ve been working on, which adds GLib- and GObject-specific checks to the static analysis process.)

One key feature I was working on throughout the hackfest was support for GVariant format string checking, which has now landed in git master. This will automatically check variadic parameters against a static GVariant format string in calls to g_variant_new(), g_variant_get() and other similar methods.

For example, this can statically catch when you forget to add one of the elements:

/*
 * Expected a GVariant variadic argument of type ‘int’ but there wasn’t one.
 *         floating_variant = g_variant_new ("(si)", "blah");
 *                                           ^
 */
{
	floating_variant = g_variant_new ("(si)", "blah");
}

Or the inevitable time you forget the tuple brackets:

/*
 * Unexpected GVariant format strings ‘i’ with unpaired arguments. If using multiple format strings, they should be enclosed in brackets to create a tuple (e.g. ‘(si)’).
 *         floating_variant = g_variant_new ("si", "blah", 56);
 *                                           ^
 */
{
	floating_variant = g_variant_new ("si", "blah", 56);
}

After Zeeshan did some smoketesting of it (and I fixed the bugs he found), I think gnome-clang is ready for slightly wider usage. If you’re interested, please install it and try it out! Instructions are on its home page. Let me know if you have any problems getting it running — I want it to be as easy to use as possible.

Another topic I discussed with Ryan and Christian at the hackfest was the idea of a GMainContext visualiser and debugger. I’ve got some ideas for this, and will hopefully find time to work on them in the near future.

Huge thanks to Chris Kühl and Endocode for the use of their offices and their unrivalled hospitality. Thanks to the GNOME Foundation for kindly sponsoring my accommodation; and thanks to my employer, Collabora, for letting me take community days to attend the hackfest.