Runtime control of debug output: Endless Orange Week

Recently at Endless we had a week of focused working on projects which are not our day-to-day work. It was called ‘Endless Orange Week’, and everyone was encouraged to explore a topic of their choosing.

I chose to look at two projects, both of which included a D-Bus/API component. My thinking was that review of the new interfaces on each project might take a while, so it would make sense to have two projects running in parallel so I could switch between them when blocked.

I’m going to blog about the two projects separately, to avoid one mega-long post.

The first project was to add a D-Bus debug interface for applications. This would allow debug output from an application to be turned on and off at runtime, rather than just being set with a command line argument or environment variable when the application is first started.

This would allow users and developers to get debug output from long-running applications without having to restart them, as quite often restarting a process will destroy the state you were hoping to debug.

What I came up with is GDebugController, which is awaiting review in GLib now. It’s an interface, currently implemented by GDebugControllerDBus. When instantiated, GDebugControllerDBus creates a new D-Bus object and interface for controlling the debug output from the application. It hooks into the standard g_debug() message functions, and can be hooked into a custom log writer function if your application uses one of those.

It essentially exists to expose one D-Bus property and allow that to be hooked in to your log writer. It has to be a bit more complex than that, though, as it needs to be able to handle authorisation: checking that the D-Bus peer who’s requesting to enable debug output on your application is actually allowed to do so. For services in particular, this is important, as allowing any peer to enable debug output could count as a privilege escalation. They might be able to slow your process down due to the volume of debug output it produces; fill the disk up; or look at the outputted logs and see private information. GDebugControllerDBus has an authorize signal to support this, and it works quite similarly to the GDBusInterfaceSkeleton::g-authorize-method signal.

Using it in an application

Firstly, you need to wait for it to be reviewed and land in GLib. The API might change during review.

Once it’s landed, assuming nothing changes, you just need to create an instance of GDebugControllerDBus. It will create the D-Bus object and hook it all up. When peers change the debug level in your application, the default handler will call g_log_set_debug_enabled() which will change the behaviour of GLib’s default log writer function.

If you have a custom log writer function, you will need to change it to check g_log_get_debug_enabled() and output debug messages if it’s true.

Using it in a service

Using it in a service will typically involve hooking up authorisation. I’ve implemented support for it in libgsystemservice, so that it will be enabled for any user of libgsystemservice after version 0.2.0.

To use polkit for authorisation, set the GssService:debug-controller-action-id property to the ID of the polkit action you want to use for authorising enabling/disabling debug mode. libgsystemservice will handle the polkit checks using that. Here’s an example.

If that property is not set, a default policy will be used, where debug requests will be accepted unconditionally if your service is running on the session bus, and rejected unconditionally if it’s running on the system bus. The thinking is that there’s no security boundary on the session bus (all peers are equally trusted), whereas there are a lot of security boundaries on the system bus so libgsystemservice is best to fail closed and force you to write your own security policy.

That’s it! Reviews and feedback welcome. Many thanks to Endless for running this week and actively encouraging everyone to make use of it.

1 thought on “Runtime control of debug output: Endless Orange Week

  1. Pingback: State persistence for apps and sessions: Endless Orange Week | Philip Withnall

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